Volcano eruption in Iceland 2021: Fagradalsfjall Update

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Do you know about the volcano eruption in Iceland? Fagradalsfjall is among the most famous volcanoes in Iceland and after 800 years in silence, on March 19, 2021 it erupted. To this day, volcanic activity is still active.

If you want to know what’s going on, read on and we’ll tell you all about the volcano eruption in Iceland in detail.

Fagradalsfjall volcano eruption in Iceland : start of the eruption

The Fagradalsfjall volcano located on the Reykjanes peninsula erupted on the night of March 19, 2021. All this formed lava rivers visible from the capital Reykjavik and a spectacular red sky. Come on, it was quite a spectacle!

The Fagradalsfjall Volcano Trek in Iceland is a favorite among travelers and even more so if you can enjoy the erupting volcano with the necessary safety measures.

Many say that seeing lava so close up is a unique experience that you have to have at least once in your life. Plus, the bright red sky will make you feel like you’re on another planet.

But Islandia offers much more than just seeing live lava, which is saying a lot. You can also visit unique places like the Jökulsárlón Lagoon and the Vatnajökull Glacier and Blue Ice Cave.

On the same day of the eruption in Iceland last March, it was the Coast Guard helicopters who surveyed the area and captured stunning images of the lava meandering.

Also, experts assure that the eruption was of >b>small dimensions and no one was in danger. It must be taken into account that this eruption was not at all a surprise after the 40,000 earthquakes of the previous weeks.

After this spectacle, the city of Grindavik voted to name the lava field Fagradalsfjall, the beautiful lava valley.

Thus, Fagradalsfjall already has another nickname, and most of the Iceland’s volcanoes have some feature that sets them apart and gives them a nickname.

Current overview

Lava path

The path that the lava has been taking began in the valley of Fagradalsfjall, more specifically to the west, and continued in the valleys to the east or Meradalir (“Grouper Valleys”), where the lava flows first spilled out.

This May 23 the lava made its mark in the Nátthagi Valley, after overcoming the artificial barriers that had been built. The government intended to avoid this situation as Nátthagi connects with the southern highway.

But not only that, lava has occupied the nearest hiking trail to this valley while creating a beautiful lava fall.

Currently, the front is very close to the southern road, less than 1.2427 mile (2 km), and lava production continues.

Nátthagi Road in Iceland

Lava flow

Iceland’s erupting volcano, Fagradalsfjall, has been spilling nearly 7925161500US gal lqd (30 million cubic meters) of lava since the start (March 29).

Will it continue to produce lava, and how much more? On May 10, it was calculated that the discharge of the lava flow was increasing and so it is! The speed with which the lava comes out and the quantities keeps increasing, from 2113US gal lqd to 3434US gal lqd (8 to 13 cubic meters) per second!

The beginning of May was characterized by lava formation from about 1312ft (400 m) to 1640ft (500 m)high and intervals of 7 to 10 minutes. Place your bets! Will the lava flow continue to increase? Or will it decrease?

One thing is clear, being able to see the rivers of lava flowing down the immense valleys must be mind-blowing, and even more so if you can tell it in first person!

Erupting volcano in Iceland Fagradalsfjall

Gas emissions

The Icelandic Meteorological Office (IMO) stated that the gas pollution will have little effect on the health of local residents.

However, caution and care must be taken. At the onset of the eruption, it was recommended that nearby residents keep windows closed and close monitoring of gas emissions began.
Ultimately, the hazards of this eruption are limited to the neighborhood of the eruption site and nearby valleys. Possible toxic gases are not affecting people in the capital.

The erupting volcano Fagradalsfjall is among the most famous and looks set to remain so. It may be even more significant that this eruption in Iceland is the first one you’ll see live 😉

After reading the latest updates on the Fagradalsfjall volcano, how long do you think it will continue to spew lava?

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